Poker Friends Blog

An inside look into our work on social Poker app Poker Friends.


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8 Tips for Winning Over My Mobile Ad Budget / Itamar Cohen, Head of Marketing @ Big Blue Parrot

 

**Originally Posted On LinkedinImage

**This is one mans opinion, but I’m sure there are many like me out there**

When I joined Big Blue Parrot in 2012, I was a nose-drooling, dirty-diaper rookie.

Coming from the creative side of traditional advertising, I knew very little about how app marketing works. I was young, inexperienced, and was being approached on a weekly basis by dozens of companies offering to market Poker Friends, with practically no ability to even distinguish between them (Seriously, why is everybody AdSomething?). let alone decide which one we should go with.

Now, a year and a half later, I’m still not sure I really know anything. 
But I did learn a few things along the way, and I do know now what kind of companies (And more importantly, people) I want to work with. 

So, if you’d like a shot at a slice of our not-too-shabby marketing budget, here’s a few insights on what’s important to me personally:

1. Reaching out for the first time? Don’t copy-paste your E-Mail / LinkedIn message

Do you know how boring it is to get the same messages with “Advertising opportunity” or “Partnership inquiry” as the subject, “Hello, (No first name)” as the opening line, and then a 30-line E-Mail about how you are a leading company in the global mobile ad space and that you work with “The top publishers in the world” – Meaning, the exact same companies everyone else works with? FOR GOD’S SAKE, SPICE IT UP A BIT.

About dynamic data – please, only personalize your message with dynamic data if you know how to do it right. I recently got a message saying “Hey, I just played your game, “Poker Friends HD – Play the worlds’ most popular cards game with a social twist”, and loved it. I couldn’t get my hands off it!”. Seriously?

If you want to personalize (And I strongly suggest you do), make sure you take five minutes to do your homework. My game means a lot to me, and I worked hard on it. Don’t tell me it’s great if you didn’t play it.

2. Download Poker Friends before the call / meeting

If we’ve set up a call/meeting, you can bet I’ve visited your website & Facebook page, read articles related to your company, and probably also asked around. I expect you to do the same, or at least open the app to know what we’re talking about.

3. Stop asking for a minimum (Insert much higher number than really needed here) test budget

Your competitors already told me it’s not true. I don’t need you to test with 10 publishers either – Give me 1-2 of your best ones, and if the traffic’s good we’ll take it from there.

4. Only take my CPI bid if you can bring the volume

There’s nothing more annoying than closing a promising deal with an attractive CPI and high volume, only to see 20 installs a day and being asked to “Raise the bid a bit to get more volume”. What the hell man.

5. Listen and adapt yourself to our current needs

Question: “Hey, I’m planning an iOS campaign in Russia, what’s your CPI/Volume there?”
Answer: “Yes, we have great Android traffic in Kurdistan”

Stop. Just stop. Unless it is an absolutely phenomenal offer, don’t do it.

6. Take some of the risk upon yourself

I know, no one can promise an (X) amount of installs at (Y) CPI at (Z) amount of time.
But if you’re asking me to invest $10-20-100K based on your estimates, you should be able to set a conservative minimum and stand behind it.

Yes, darling, tell me those three wonderful words I want to hear so badly: 
Money Back Guarantee.

7. Be responsive, flexible and service-oriented

I love working with SuperSonic ads.
You know why? Because most of our conversations look like this:
Me: “Hey, I need a campaign set up in country (X), (Y) CPI”
Them (No longer than an hour later): “Cool, you’ll get (X) installs a day. It’s ready, let me know when to activate it”.

I love working with other companies a lot less.
You know why? Because most of our conversations look like this:
Me: “Hey, I need a campaign set up in country (X), (Y) CPI”
Them (Sometimes a day later): “Cool, please create your campaign in our incredibly complicated, buggy dashboard, then sign an IO for much more than you actually need and the money will stay in your balance so we’ll have a guarantee you’ll spend it”.

You can see why I would prefer A to B.

8. Keep me updated regularly about the opportunities you offer

So, we talked, and things didn’t work out on round one. That’s cool, we’re running a marathon here. My data might change, the market might change, and your offers might change. That’s why I would love to hear from you on a week/two-week basis, just to see what’s up.

A bad way to do this: “Hey Itamar, how’s it going? Is Big Blue Parrot sending you to the convention everyone’s attending in some awesome country that isn’t Israel, at their expense? It would be great to meet up there!”. NO, THEY’RE NOT. AND THANKS FOR RUINING MY DAY.

A good way to do this: “Hey Itamar, how are you guys doing? I wanted to let you know we have a really great offer for (Platform) in (Country). If this is relevant for your current needs, let me know.”

In conclusion

I love you and want to work with you. Please love me back.

– Itamar

P.S 
22.06.2014 Update – I’m currently looking for:
– Low-CPI, iOS traffic in Spain and Russia
– High-quality, iOS traffic in the US

Talk to me.


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Hey, Mr. App Review Man, Stop Asking Money From Me!

This is a real steamer.

One of the first things you find when you search for “Promote your iOS App” (It’s ok, we’ve all done it) is article 1/2/5 (depending on the company trying to promote itself by writing a blog) – “Get your app reviewed by bloggers and app review sites”.

You think to yourself “Hey, that’s great! I have a good app, I’ll write to them and if they’ll like it, they’ll review it. Basically, they’re app news sites, right?”. AHHHH, wrong.

These sites all have the exact same reply:

“Thanks for submitting to us. We’d love to review your app, but we’re just overly swamped with tons of requests because our site is really really really popular. The good news is, you can ensure a review for X dollars! of course, you can choose not to pay, and we will still review your app. in about 5-10 years.”

So, our advice is – if you were fortunate enough to land here before wasting countless hours on meaningless submissions, direct your marketing efforts elsewhere. For example, you can write a blog about what it’s like to develop an app and hope it will catch on.